Technology has changed the way we live, work, play, learn, and interact. Are you a teacher or a parent, you may sometimes feel like you are navigating uncharted territory.

In this digital age, parents face all-new challenges to child safety. Since its creation in 1994, the Internet has given anonymity for child predators. Cell phones also pose new threats to the safety of children.

 

Talk with your child before setting up and logging on to his/her new computer. Setting ground rules for Internet access can go a long way toward building an online environment stimulating your home.

 

Internet security

The veil of the Internet gives the possibility of predators pretend they are someone else. They use chat rooms and social media pages children posing children themselves. That is why it is important to monitor the online activities of your children. The computers within the home should be in public as the living room or study, never in a private room. Familiarize yourself with the sites your children attend and the people they are talking online. Some programs and websites keep chat logs and messages so you can see that engages your children in conversation. There are several web-browsing safe programs you can download that monitor Internet activity and protect your children from dangerous sites.

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Cell Phone Safety

Many children today have cell phones, but it is important to teach your children about cell phone applications and personal information. Depending on the phone, parental control can prevent children from downloading harmful applications and by limiting access to the Internet. There are applications available that can track your child’s location and monitor their calls and messages.

 

Personal information

It’s good that children learn their name, address, and telephone number at an early age in an emergency. However, children should also know the importance of not giving out personal information to someone other than a police officer or paramedic. They should be able to tell the difference between strangers, friends, and authority figures.

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“Insist that it is not their fault if they see something that makes them feel uncomfortable or scared. “If your child does come to you with something disturbing, report it to the competent authorities.

 


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